Hathersage - Stanage Edge - Carl Wark

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Starting in the village of Hathersage, where there are many amenities including outdoor shops and cafes and toilets near the post office, this walk encompasses different landscapes and history.

From the village the way is along a lane leading you to North Lees, which was one of a number of houses that Charlotte Bronte looked at during her visit to the area in 1845 and was featured in her book 'Jane Eyre'.

Continue up to Stanage Edge and look out for abandoned millstones, left when the industry collapsed and French millstones were imported cheaper and also ground finer flour. Now we are at full circle with wholemeal flour! Stanage Edge is a popular playground for rock climbers; no doubt you will both hear and see them. Also look out for 'bowls' carved into the rocks; a local gamekeeper in the early 1900s was paid a penny apiece to carve them as drinking bowls for either the dogs or grouse. From High Neb there are fantastic views, a rich reward for a little effort.

Leaving Stanage Edge we now walk along the Duke of Rutland's Drive, a track running a gentle course under Burbage Rocks. Leave the track and cross Burbage Brook via an old pack-horse bridge up to the depression between Carl Wark and Higger Tor. It is worth taking time to examine this ancient bastion, traversing the great wall defending the only weakness on this prized natural stronghold.

The route brings us back towards the village via the Church of St Michael's. Allow time to inspect Little John's grave and the predominantly 14th and 15th Century church which contains not only a chancel window rescued from the submerged Derwent parish church, but also several brasses of the Eyre family.

A great day out, but do not forget to look out for Robin Hood's cave on Stanage Edge. Although it is not known if he did hide there, it is quite plausible.

England - Central England - Derbyshire - Peak District

Features

Ancient Monument, Birds, Flowers, Food Shop, Good for Kids, Great Views, Hills or Fells, Moor, Mountains, National Trust, Pub, Tea Shop, Toilets, Wildlife, Woodland
22/12/2015 - Di Farrell

A brilliant walk and fine for all seasons as you can avoid cows by returning via Mitchell fields in the summer and using the listed route late Nov-April. If you are a lightweight person check the wind as on the top of the Edge it can be testing even for me with 2 Dobermanns to anchor me !

22/12/2015 - Di Farrell

A brilliant walk and fine for all seasons as you can avoid cows by returning via Mitchell fields in the summer and using the listed route late Nov-April. If you are a lightweight person check the wind as on the top of the Edge it can be testing even for me with 2 Dobermanns to anchor me !

28/07/2014 - Norman Brannick

Completed this walk 28th July 2014. What a fantastic walk this was, my thanks to Eric Davies, it was strenuous but not as bad as I thought it was going to be. One comment I would make: At WM 12 Eric states 'pick up the path on the right which runs under the edge' should read 'pick up the path on the left' Apart from this directions were spot on.. I would highly recommend this walk for the views and the village of Hathersage..

12/03/2009 - Sarah Stirman

Thoroughly enjoyed this walk on 10/3/09 - a clear and bright day (by the afternoon anyway!) Deviated slighly from the route after Carl Wark, went through Mitchell Field, really gorgeous walk.

Walkingworld members near this walk

Accommodation
Distance away
18.7 Miles
Holidays and activities
Distance away
6.2 Miles
Clubs/Walking Groups
Distance away
Pubs, cafes and restaurants
Distance away
11.8 Miles