Scamblesby - Belchford - Fulletby

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The walk starts in the centre of the small village of Scamblesby and heads south on a section of the Viking Way Long-distance Footpath. This long-distance path starts on the south bank of the Humber and finishes on the banks of Rutland Water.

This section of the Viking Way is fairly hilly, traversing the glacial scenery of the Wolds. The main drainage runs east and west and so the walking crosses valleys and separating ridges, giving sweeping views of the Wolds as you climb each ridge. It climbs over a ridge to the village of Belchford, then heads off again across valley and ridge to Fulletby, the second highest village in Lincolnshire. The line of the Viking Way is clearly waymarked with Viking helmet in black on a yellow ground.

At this point, after a brief exploration of the charming village of Fulletby, it departs and heads back north along less well-used footpaths to return to Belchford and then Scamblesby. As you leave Fulletby, drop down the ridge to the Waring Valley and look to the west. On a clear day the Lincoln Edge is visible across the Witham Valley, with the Lincoln Gap and the towers of Lincoln Cathedral silhouetted on its northern shoulder.

The path here crosses sandy heathland as it drops down the ridge to the bridge over the River Waring. This area has several wildlife reserves either side of the footpath. These are the haunt of warblers and a very different flora to that on the wolds on the outward stage of the walk.

From Belchford, the walk returns to Scamblesby across fields past a landscaped area of ponds and woodland planting around a new holiday cottage development. The area around Scamblesby has several permissive bridleways and footpaths that complement the route but are not shown on OS maps. Where they may cause confusion, this is indicated in the text.

There is accommodation and food available at the Bluebell Inn, Belchford and The Green Man, Scamblesby (on Google maps). The neighbouring towns of Horncastle and Louth have accommodation, cafes and eating places.

For the less adventurous or less fit, the walk can be reduced in two ways and still give access to the delights of the Wolds, firstly by starting at Scamblesby and following the route as far as Waymark 6 and then taking the lane west from Waymark 5 to rejoin the route at Waymark 16. Alternatively the walk can be started in Belchford at Waymark 6 and continued to Waymark 16. There is roadside parking on the western approach lane to Belchford between Waymarks 5 and 16.

In wet weather the paths can be very muddy and slippery where they cross cultivated land or fields with stock in them. The practice of cultivating over path lines and then spraying off the crop growth is used on several sections of the route. Boots are essential in these conditions. The route is relatively dog-friendly with few stiles, mostly gates. Where the route crosses fields with seasonal stock in them, or the wildlife reserves, dogs must be kept on a short lead.

England - East England - Lincolnshire - Lincolnshire Wolds

Features

Ancient Monument, Birds, Butterflies, Flowers, Great Views, Hills or Fells, Pub, Public Transport, Restaurant, Waterfall, Wildlife
23/08/2014 - Paul and Tracy Dawson

Really super walk with plenty to see. Pretty decent paths and bridleways, the climbs are only gradual. We sat on a bench in the churchyard at Fulletby for our picnic. Managed to knock an hour off of Barrys time (we must be fit! ;-)) Guide and info. excellent

08/01/2011 - Simon Nurse

Excellent walk.

11/09/2010 - David Neild

Walked this in a howling gale and very heavy showers. It was one of those days when you get soaked and just when you are about to dry out it rains again. It was certainly an invigorating walk. The notes for the walk were spot on. We did get our timings out a little as we were too early to eat at the Bluebell Inn (though its too early in the walk really for a lunch stop!) and too late back at Scramblesby for lunch - though did enjoy a pint. We hardly met a soul en route - but that may be more to do with the weather!]