The Mull of Galloway Trail South to North: Part One

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The 24-mile Mull of Galloway Trail, created in 2012 by the Rotary Club of Stranraer, links to the Loch Ryan and Ayrshire Coastal Paths. It starts from the lighthouse or the RSPB information office at the Mull of Galloway and the first half is described in Walk 7001. The second half of the Trail is covered by Walk 7002, north from Chapel Rossan Bay, Ardwell for twelve miles to its end at the Tourist Information Office in Stranraer. There are nine waymarker-posts and fourteen information boards along the whole length of the Trail, most of which are mentioned in the text.

Don't let the Trail's modest height gain deceive you. 7001 is fairly strenuous and traverses a variety of terrains, some difficult underfoot. You will pass through fields and woods, walk along sandy or stony foreshores, follow cliff-top paths on the seaward side of fences and occasionally, have to negotiate rampant vegetation which has all but obliterated your path! This is definitely not a walk for children, or for dogs. In fact, it is quite a challenging test for the fit, the determined and the resilient. The Trail's attractions include its superb sea views, its secluded bays and the chance to spot wildlife such as otters, seals and seabirds, also maybe whale or basking-shark at the Mull, all interspersed with lovely bluebell woods and views over farmland and moor.

We anticipate that walkers will opt to tackle the complete Trail over two or three days, which is what we would recommend for their 'health and safety'. There is hotel accommodation en route at Drummore and Sandhead, listed under Additional Information, plus a few bed-and-breakfast establishments.

The 407 bus plies between Stranraer and Drummore, Mondays to Saturdays inclusive. The chief drawback of the Mull of Galloway Trail is that there is at present no public transport south of Drummore. This means that either the intending walker must organize a lift south from the bus terminus at Drummore, or else be prepared first to walk the five miles-plus south to the Mull. Walk 6718 covers this stretch of the Trail.

Scotland - South Scotland - Dumfries and Galloway - Coast

Features

Ancient Monument, Birds, Butterflies, Cafe, Church, Flowers, Food Shop, Great Views, Industrial Archaeology, Moor, Mostly Flat, Play Area, Pub, Public Transport, Restaurant, River, Sea, Tea Shop, Toilets, Wildlife, Woodland