Wootton St Lawrence

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This is a peaceful and very pleasant walk across farmland and through several private estates, near the village of Wootton St Lawrence. Only three miles from the centre of Basingstoke, it feels right off the beaten track. There is no 'hum' from the M3 despite its being not far away, and there are no lorries or off-road vehicles.

You pass very close to the Grade II Listed Tangier House. It was built in the 17th Century and substantially altered in the 18th. It was apparently re-named Tangier House to commemorate the marriage of Charles II with Catherine of Braganza.

You also pass through the grounds of Malshanger House. This Regency house is also Grade II listed. Although not visible from the route described,it is interesting as belonging to Sir Michael Colman, of mustard fame, and is part of the estate hereabouts that produces Summerdown Mints. See Additional Info.

The extensive woods at Wootton were renowned in the late Middle Ages and on more than one occasion in the 14th Century members of the royal family held hunting parties there. Timber from these woods was used in reconstructing Winchester Cathedral in the 14th Century, and later three huge oaks were sent to form the roof of what is now the upper floor of the Deanery.

The Church of St Lawrence (usually open to visitors) was built in 1864, incorporating many original features of the earlier mediaeval building. The north arcade dates from the 12th Century and the tower and some of the windows are early 14th Century.

Re-written after footpath closures around Tangier House 2016-2017.

England - South England - Hampshire - Countryside

Features

Birds, Church, Good for Kids, Great Views, Stately Home, Wildlife, Woodland
21/08/2017 - Jill Hamilton

Beautiful walk through some stunning varied landscape and woodland, great on hotter day as lots of shade. Only one stile was issue with springer spaniel which was coming back across Tangiers Park field, luckily we could lift her, at a push you could go down the drive and explain why. At point 3 where it states that the landowner has left the ground rutted etc, I would suggest walking with the fence on your right down the side of the field as to go between the fence and woodland is a nightmare, stinging nettles and brambles and uneven ground. We couldn't as they were combining the field but evidence looks like others walk down there, which I would recommend.

14/03/2014 - Karen Dawe

This is an easy walk that we have enjoyed with our dog on many occasions. It takes in some fabulous views of the countryside and also passes through the grounds of a beautiful house. It is fairly dog friendly but be aware of the Alpacas in one of the fields, you will need to keep your dog on the lead although they are very friendly. Tangiers house has recently been sold so the Alpacas may be on the move soon as may the route of a couple of footpaths through the grounds. We would highly recommend this walk in any season.

08/04/2012 - Rebecca Salway

Section 11 the trail bears left before you get to the sharp left. Section 13 we found a gap in the hedge but it took us to into the wrong field so we ended up walking all around it and going through a small wood before we popped out by the alpacas again. I would suggest ignoring the first gap on the right and continuing down the trail a bit further. Lovely walk through some varied terrain and nice and level for the most part good for dogs unless they are afraid of alpacas.

04/01/2009 - Andrew Long

Pleasant walk in the Hampshire Country with some pleasing views. Richard is right the llamas were very curious and cute not to mention well behaved. Comments and photo to follow.

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Distance away
30.5 Miles